Radiohead Closes Headlining Set At Outside Lands With ‘Karma Police’ [Watch]

first_imgThe last time Radiohead played Outside Lands was the festival’s inaugural year in 2008.The sound gave out twice on that Friday night in August, creating a brief, silent rock show for the small eternity it lingered. But Thom Yorke and the rest of the collective didn’t miss a beat, miming their way through the sonic void.Each audio miscue was promptly corrected, and the dense crowd overflowed with joy watching these titans of experimental alternative create the festival’s foothold in the music scene.Saturday night, in their return to the Lands End main stage at Golden Gate Park, silence fell again, but this time it wasn’t a malfunction.The muted reception from the crowd blanketed the tens of thousands watching into an authentic identity crisis, prompting the question of whether you came for a performance or for an experience.With EDM standout Zedd putting on a sensory-touching performance across the park, it was the perfect example of how much the live music culture has changed over the past eight years.“Burn the Witch” and the ambient ways of “Daydreaming,” the first two tracks on A Moon Shaped Pool, kicked off the set with a sort of anti-opener atmosphere that left the gathered speechless and Yorke skyrocketing to his musical pocket.The set was absolute bliss, with moody staples “Everything in its Right Place,” “Pyramid Song,” “Nude” blended around danceable numbers like “Lotus Flower” and “The Gloaming.”“Weird Fishes” and “Paranoid Android” provided a more palatable contrast, but there was certainly a purpose to the song selection.Radiohead’s music pushes boundaries and can make people feel uncomfortable. You’re unknowingly forced to address your true driving force for seeing live music, and many responded to that by turning around and seeking out the electronic dance party instead.There’s nothing wrong with that. Those that wanted to be there got what they wanted. Music festivals are special because of the collective experience they offer, but with Radiohead, the set was a little more selfish, focused more individual enjoyment.And this is why Outside Lands stands apart from many of its peers. It’s a perfect reminder of our history and future, and unites those two worlds with ease every single year.There was a shared experience at the end, though. Everyone came together and sang the final words of “Karma Police” with a tinge of truth attached, belting out, “For a minute, I lost myself.”What we found, was another masterful show from Radiohead and a special moment for its fans.Watch “Karma Police” below, courtesy of L Yap.You can see the full setlist below.Edit this setlist | More Radiohead setlistslast_img read more

US to lift BSE-related ban on Canadian cattle

first_img The USDA rule announced yesterday also sets conditions for the importation of sheep, goats, cervids (deer and elk), and llamas, as well as meat and other products derived from them. The 500-page rule will be published in the Federal Register Jan 4 and will take effect Mar 7, the agency said. Surveillance for BSE at levels that have met or exceeded international guidelines for at least the past 7 years Live Canadian cattle will be allowed into the United States only under restrictions designed to ensure that they are slaughtered by the time they reach 30 months of age, the USDA said. The cattle will have to bear permanent marks indicating their origin and must be transported in sealed containers to a feedlot or to slaughter. Moving cattle to more than one feedlot in the United States will be prohibited. “After conducting an extensive review, we are confident that imports of certain commodities from regions of minimal risk can occur with virtually no risk to human or animal health,” US Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said in a news release. Dec 30, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – US officials announced plans yesterday to end the ban on the importation of live Canadian cattle that was imposed when Canada discovered its first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in May 2003. In considering whether to reopen the borders, the USDA considered the possibility of more cases of BSE in Canada, DeHaven said. “Because of the mitigation measures that Canada has in place, we continue to believe the risk is minimal.” See also: When Canada reported its first BSE case in an Alberta cow in May 2003, the United States immediately banned importation of all cattle, beef, and related products from Canada. In August 2003, the USDA lifted the ban on boneless meat from cattle less than 30 months old as well as a few other products from cattle, sheep, and goats. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) said the borders will be reopened to live cattle less than 30 months of age and certain other products starting Mar 7. BSE, or mad cow disease, has very rarely been found in cattle younger than 30 months. The decision was based on a determination that Canada is a “minimal risk region” for BSE. If BSE were confirmed in the Canadian cow, “It would not alter the implementation of the U.S. rule announced yesterday that recognizes Canada as a Minimal-Risk Region,” Dr. Ron DeHaven, head of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, said in a statement. Ironically, yesterday’s USDA announcement was followed today by a Canadian announcement of a suspected case of BSE in a 10-year-old dairy cow. Results of confirmatory tests on the cow were expected in 3 to 5 days (see link below for separate story). Today USDA officials said they remain confident that Canada’s BSE-prevention program is sound. The USDA cited several Canadian BSE safeguards that helped justify the conclusion that the risk of BSE in Canadian cattle is low: A ban on the use of “specified risk materials” (SRM) in human food. SRM include tissues such as the brain, spinal cord, certain nerve bundles, small intestine, and tonsils, which are likely to carry the BSE agent in an infected animal. (The United States imposed a similar ban on using SRM in human food after its first BSE case was discovered in December 2003.)center_img Import restrictions that minimize exposure to BSE. Since 1990 Canada has banned live ruminants and ruminant products, including rendered protein, from countries that have found BSE in native cattle or are considered to be at significant risk for BSE. Dec 29 USDA announcement CIDRAP News story on the report of a suspected BSE case in Canada “Appropriate epidemiological investigations, risk assessment, and risk mitigation measures imposed as necessary” The USDA first proposed to lift the ban on young Canadian cattle in November 2003. The discovery of the first US case of BSE, in a Canadian-born cow in Washington state in December 2003, prompted the agency to extend the public comment period on that proposal until April of this year. The plan unveiled yesterday appears similar to the proposal presented in November 2003. Even though a renewed flow of Canadian cattle could lower beef prices in the United States, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) welcomed the USDA announcement. NCBA President Jan Lyons said the US beef industry, which lost export markets after the American BSE case was found a year ago, should benefit from the move in the long run. “We expect our trading partners to base their decisions to trade with us on science, and we must do the same,” Lyons stated. “The precedent that has been set by our handling of trade issues with Canada is hurting our government’s ability to fully reopen markets to U.S. beef exports. We must normalize trade with Canada in order for our industry to move forward in the global marketplace, expand our ability to sell U.S. beef to foreign consumers, and put more dollars in the pockets of U.S. producers.” Transcript of Dec 29 USDA news briefing Dec 30 statement by AHIS Administrator Ron DeHaven Before the ban on Canadian cattle, the United States bought about 70% of Canada’s live cattle exports, according to an Associated Press (AP) report today. The New York Times cited a prediction from USDA officials that American feedlots would import 2 million cattle from Canada in 2005, which could lower beef prices for American consumers. A ban on feeding ruminant protein to ruminants since 1997 (the same year the United States imposed a similar ban)last_img read more