Reed Mathis’ Electric Beethoven To Make Colorado Debut Next Week

first_imgReed Mathis’ Electric Beethoven recently came on the scene and has been taking the jam world by storm as of late. With re-imagined workings of the classical composer Ludwig van Beethoven‘s 3rd and 6th Symphonies, Mathis, along with keyboardist Todd Stoops (RAQ), drummer Jay Lane (Primus/RatDog), and guitarist Clay Welch, go on improvisational explorations to the deepest depths of each individual movement.Getting To Know Electric Beethoven: An Interview With Reed MathisThe CDM (Classical Dance Music) quartet will be making their Colorado debut next week, with a pair of shows at Denver’s Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom on Nov. 12th and 13th, followed by a performance at Fort Collins’ Hodi’s Half Note on Nov. 14th. Expect to go on a musical journey.Coming off of two major performances at Brooklyn Comes Alive and a marathon of a show at New York City’s DROM last week, Mathis and company are primed and ready to blast off. This is not the type of performance you see everyday, so do yourself a favor and check this project out. This is jam on a whole other level.Purchase tickets to the Cervantes shows here, and Hodi’s Half Note here.Cervantes FB Event Page for updates and additional info.Hodi’s Half Note FB Event Page for updates and additional info.Check out “Finale” from the group’s Brooklyn Comes Alive performance:last_img read more

DHS offers tips during flooding situations

first_imgHOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A FLOOD THREATENSPrepare NOWKnow types of flood risk in your area. Visit FEMA’s Flood Map Service Centerfor information.Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.If flash flooding is a risk in your location, then monitor potential signs, such as heavy rain.Gather supplies in case you have to leave immediately, or if services are cut off. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets. Obtain extra batteries and charging devices for phones and other critical equipment.Keep important documents in a waterproof container. Create password-protected digital copies.Protect your property. Move valuables to higher levels. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves. Consider a sump pump with a battery.Survive DURINGDepending on where you are, and the impact and the warning time of flooding, go to the safe location that you previously identified.If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Never drive around barricades. Local responders use them to safely direct traffic out of flooded areas.Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local radio station for current emergency information and instructions.Do not walk, swim, or drive through floodwaters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown!Stay off bridges over fast-moving water. Fast-moving water can wash bridges away without warning.If your vehicle is trapped in rapidly moving water, then stay inside. If water is rising inside the vehicle, then seek refuge on the roof.If trapped in a building, then go to its highest level. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising floodwater. Go on the roof only if necessary. Once there, signal for help.Be Safe AFTERListen to authorities for information and instructions. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.Avoid driving, except in emergencies.Snakes and other animals may be in your house. Wear heavy gloves and boots during clean up.Be aware of the risk of electrocution. Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off the electricity to prevent electric shock.Avoid wading in floodwater, which can contain dangerous debris and be contaminated. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery ONLY outdoors and away from windows. The Department of Homeland Security wants you to stay safe with the potential for flooding in the area over the next week. Failing to evacuate flooded areas, entering flood waters, or remaining after a flood has passed can result in injury or death. DHS says to follow the steps below to stay prepared.  IF YOU ARE UNDER A FLOOD WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAYDo not walk, swim, or drive through floodwaters. Turn Around, Don’t Drown!Just six inches of moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away. Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.Determine how best to protect yourself based on the type of flooding.Evacuate if told to do so.Move to higher ground or a higher floor.Stay where you are.last_img read more