Florida Bands Join Forces For ‘Fool Moon’ Late Night Throwdown Post-Fool’s Paradise

first_imgWe could not be more excited for the first annual Fool’s Paradise – a funk-fueled destination beach event hosted by Lettuce – at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre in St. Augustine, Florida on April 1 & 2, 2016.When the amphitheatre lights go down, the party is not over. In addition to Late Night events featuring Vulfpeck, Break Science, Goldfish and a ‘Fools of Funk’ supergroup, Fool’s Paradise is excited to announce “Fool Moon,” a new late-night offering at St. Augustine music scene staple (and grilled cheese emporium), Planet Sarbez.Less than two miles from the St. Augustine Amphitheatre, each Late Night will feature blowout sets by Jacksonville powerhouse Herd of Watts; on Friday they’ll be joined by Gainesville reggae-funk monsters Morning Fatty, and on Saturday MANẎFEST will kickstart the night, with Orlando’s rock machine The Groove Orient shutting it down.Building on the energy from their Fool’s Paradise sets (Herd of Watts, Morning Fatty, Groove Orient), these after-dark shows will feature live painting, special guests, and a unique art-house ambience, easily making this a “must” for everyone’s weekend plans.Tickets for the main festival are still available but going fast, with extremely limited VIP and hotel packages remaining. Fool’s Moon will be a $10 cover at the door, separate from festival and package ticketing. For more information, head to the event group.Tickets for Fool’s Paradise are moving quickly, and they can be found here!last_img read more

Dry winter ahead

first_imgPaz said two climate scenarios are possible for this fall and winter. If a La Niña forms in the next few months, the Southeast will likely have a warm, dry fall and winter. But if the Pacific Ocean remains in the neutral phase, the result would be rainfall and temperature patterns close to normal. “Each agricultural group I meet with has its own set of concerns,” he said. “And lately, they center around the drought.” Despite the onset of what the SECC calls the “convective rainy season,” rainfall totals for the year remain below average except for in isolated areas, such as parts of central Georgia. The southwest corner of Georgia, around Seminole and Decatur counties, has been dry, too. The drought caused an increase in late planting, and these crops will need ample rain well into September. Paz is one of a team of scientists involved in the Southeast Climate Consortium, which tracks and predicts how the climate will affect crops and farmers in Georgia, Florida and Alabama. “If a La Niña does form in the Pacific Ocean in the next few months, it’s known to increase the likelihood of a warm and dry fall and winter in the Southeast,” he said. “Drier-than-normal conditions this fall and winter will make things really hard for farmers who’ll be harvesting peanuts in September and October.” Colder-than-normal surface temperatures in the eastern tropical Pacific and the greater extent of deeper cool water are signs that it’s “as likely as not that a full La Niña will develop sometime this fall,” he said. Rainfall in western Georgia, northern Alabama and the Florida Panhandle still lags behind. These areas remain in a drought ranging from severe to exceptional, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. “A La Niña is likely to happen this fall, and if it does, we’ll be in deep trouble,” Paz said. “Our rainfall level is already down 20 inches in some areas of the state.”center_img “A winter season with near-normal rainfall would go a long way toward easing drought conditions in Alabama and Georgia,” Paz said. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaThe crowd of Georgia peanut shellers gasped at Joel Paz’s presentation. The slides weren’t gory, but the information was scary nonetheless. Peanut shellers don’t want to hear that the state’s rain deficit will likely continue into the fall. “The shellers are really concerned over the quantity and quality of the peanuts they’ll get this year,” said Paz, an agrometeorologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Pasture conditions have improved slightly in northeast and central Georgia,” he said. “But a dry August and September could be stressful to forage crops and grazing herds.” On July 31, the U.S. Department of Agriculture declared 36 percent of Georgia’s corn crop and 40 percent of the state’s hay crop to be in “very poor to poor condition.” Summer afternoon thundershowers brought some beneficial rainfall to the Southeast. Tropical storm Barry was the first to bring relief to the drought-stricken Southeast on June 2, Paz said. Barry came ashore in the Big Bend of Florida and brought welcome, widespread rainfall to eastern and southern parts of Georgia and most of Florida. Farmers statewide would benefit from a neutral climate phase this fall and winter. The state’s extreme drought has already withered pastures to the point that farmers are desperately searching for alternatives for nonexistent or low-quality hay. See complete agricultural climate predictions at the SECC Web site (www.agclimate.org).last_img read more