Center for European Studies funds undergraduate research

first_imgThe Center for European Studies (CES) recently announced its 2011-12 student grant winners, continuing its long tradition of promoting and funding student research on political, historical, economic, social, cultural, and intellectual trends in modern or contemporary Europe. Thirty-seven undergraduates will pursue thesis research and internships in Europe this summer, while 12 graduate students have been awarded support for their dissertations over the coming year.CES undergraduate senior thesis travel grants fund summer research in Europe for juniors in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences preparing senior theses. Graduate dissertation research fellowships fund students who plan to spend six months to a year in Europe conducting dissertation research, while graduate dissertation writing fellowships are intended to support doctoral candidates as they complete their dissertations. These grants and fellowships are funded by CES and by the Krupp Foundation.
For more information, visit http://ces.fas.harvard.edu/.last_img read more

US to lift BSE-related ban on Canadian cattle

first_img The USDA rule announced yesterday also sets conditions for the importation of sheep, goats, cervids (deer and elk), and llamas, as well as meat and other products derived from them. The 500-page rule will be published in the Federal Register Jan 4 and will take effect Mar 7, the agency said. Surveillance for BSE at levels that have met or exceeded international guidelines for at least the past 7 years Live Canadian cattle will be allowed into the United States only under restrictions designed to ensure that they are slaughtered by the time they reach 30 months of age, the USDA said. The cattle will have to bear permanent marks indicating their origin and must be transported in sealed containers to a feedlot or to slaughter. Moving cattle to more than one feedlot in the United States will be prohibited. “After conducting an extensive review, we are confident that imports of certain commodities from regions of minimal risk can occur with virtually no risk to human or animal health,” US Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said in a news release. Dec 30, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – US officials announced plans yesterday to end the ban on the importation of live Canadian cattle that was imposed when Canada discovered its first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in May 2003. In considering whether to reopen the borders, the USDA considered the possibility of more cases of BSE in Canada, DeHaven said. “Because of the mitigation measures that Canada has in place, we continue to believe the risk is minimal.” See also: When Canada reported its first BSE case in an Alberta cow in May 2003, the United States immediately banned importation of all cattle, beef, and related products from Canada. In August 2003, the USDA lifted the ban on boneless meat from cattle less than 30 months old as well as a few other products from cattle, sheep, and goats. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) said the borders will be reopened to live cattle less than 30 months of age and certain other products starting Mar 7. BSE, or mad cow disease, has very rarely been found in cattle younger than 30 months. The decision was based on a determination that Canada is a “minimal risk region” for BSE. If BSE were confirmed in the Canadian cow, “It would not alter the implementation of the U.S. rule announced yesterday that recognizes Canada as a Minimal-Risk Region,” Dr. Ron DeHaven, head of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, said in a statement. Ironically, yesterday’s USDA announcement was followed today by a Canadian announcement of a suspected case of BSE in a 10-year-old dairy cow. Results of confirmatory tests on the cow were expected in 3 to 5 days (see link below for separate story). Today USDA officials said they remain confident that Canada’s BSE-prevention program is sound. The USDA cited several Canadian BSE safeguards that helped justify the conclusion that the risk of BSE in Canadian cattle is low: A ban on the use of “specified risk materials” (SRM) in human food. SRM include tissues such as the brain, spinal cord, certain nerve bundles, small intestine, and tonsils, which are likely to carry the BSE agent in an infected animal. (The United States imposed a similar ban on using SRM in human food after its first BSE case was discovered in December 2003.)center_img Import restrictions that minimize exposure to BSE. Since 1990 Canada has banned live ruminants and ruminant products, including rendered protein, from countries that have found BSE in native cattle or are considered to be at significant risk for BSE. Dec 29 USDA announcement CIDRAP News story on the report of a suspected BSE case in Canada “Appropriate epidemiological investigations, risk assessment, and risk mitigation measures imposed as necessary” The USDA first proposed to lift the ban on young Canadian cattle in November 2003. The discovery of the first US case of BSE, in a Canadian-born cow in Washington state in December 2003, prompted the agency to extend the public comment period on that proposal until April of this year. The plan unveiled yesterday appears similar to the proposal presented in November 2003. Even though a renewed flow of Canadian cattle could lower beef prices in the United States, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) welcomed the USDA announcement. NCBA President Jan Lyons said the US beef industry, which lost export markets after the American BSE case was found a year ago, should benefit from the move in the long run. “We expect our trading partners to base their decisions to trade with us on science, and we must do the same,” Lyons stated. “The precedent that has been set by our handling of trade issues with Canada is hurting our government’s ability to fully reopen markets to U.S. beef exports. We must normalize trade with Canada in order for our industry to move forward in the global marketplace, expand our ability to sell U.S. beef to foreign consumers, and put more dollars in the pockets of U.S. producers.” Transcript of Dec 29 USDA news briefing Dec 30 statement by AHIS Administrator Ron DeHaven Before the ban on Canadian cattle, the United States bought about 70% of Canada’s live cattle exports, according to an Associated Press (AP) report today. The New York Times cited a prediction from USDA officials that American feedlots would import 2 million cattle from Canada in 2005, which could lower beef prices for American consumers. A ban on feeding ruminant protein to ruminants since 1997 (the same year the United States imposed a similar ban)last_img read more

Gender choice: are you Mr, Ms or Mx? (Aust)

first_imgThe Australian 23 May 2016Family First Comment: Australia has officially lost their way!“In February, the Australian ¬Bureau of Statistics issued a “standard for sex and gender variables, 2016” which listed an “other” category. “The inclusion of the ‘please specify’ write-in facility for ‘Other’ allows respondents the opportunity to describe their sex using a term they are comfortable with, while also maximising the potential for analysis of the responses provided.” Imagine the phone call – “Which gender are you? I’ll read out the 55 options….”Gonna be a looooooong phone call. :)  Government departments facing a July 1 deadline to comply with new federal gender guidelines are introducing new categories alongside male and female on forms and advising staff to refrain from assuming a person’s gender based on their name. Thousands of voters updating their personal electoral details ¬before this year’s federal election have been given an option to list their gender as unspecified, as part of a broader push to eradicate ¬gender-based assumptions.The Australian Electoral Commission has also recently started accepting Mx as a title, with a -default gender of indeterminate. This year’s census on August 9 will be the first where people are provided the option to identify as male, female or “other”.In February, the Australian ¬Bureau of Statistics issued a “standard for sex and gender variables, 2016” which listed an “other” category. “The inclusion of the ‘please specify’ write-in facility for ‘Other’ allows respondents the opportunity to describe their sex using a term they are comfortable with, while also maximising the potential for analysis of the responses provided,” the standard states. Government agencies are following the Australian Government Guidelines on the Recognition of Sex and Gender, updated in November last year, and issued by the Attorney-General’s Department. The ABS said the guidelines meant it had advised staff they “should refrain from making assumptions about a person’s sex and/or gender identity based on indicators such as their name, voice or appearance, and suggests that when interviews are conducted interviewers should read out the question and all response options.”http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/gender-choice-are-you-mr-ms-or-mx/news-story/426ae8ffaddfa2e48740930438f4afeblast_img read more

Uhuru extends nationwide curfew for a further 30 days

first_imgThe President further directed all sporting facilities including stadia be availed by the Ministry of Health for isolation purposes.“Government Institutions including all sporting facilities, stadia and educational institutions and other government facilities, upon designation by the Cabinet Secretary for Health Mutahi Kagwe as a public health facility, shall be availed to the Ministry of Health for isolation and quarantine purposes,” said the President.Also Read  Women leaders welcome CJ’s decision to dissolve Parliament Also Read  PPRA faults Mochache for irregular procurement of PPEs at KEMSA President Uhuru Kenyatta has extended the nationwide curfew for a further 30 days in a bid to curb COVID-19.The President who was speaking during a press briefing on COVID -19 situation in the country ordered police to spare no individual even politicians who will be found out after curfew hours without being an essential worker.“The Inspector General of Police shall ensure that his officers spare no mheshimiwa, or individual, regardless of social status or rank, who is either out after curfew or who flaunts the health protocols without being an essential worker.  The rules are for all of us, and rank or status does not exempt you from them,” warned President Kenyatta. He directed the Ministry of Health to develop protocol to temporarily retain retired ICU staff to ensure adequate stuffing in health facilities to address the surging numbers of those infected by COVID-19. Get breaking news on your Mobile as-it-happens. SMS ‘NEWS’ to 20153last_img read more