Radiohead Closes Headlining Set At Outside Lands With ‘Karma Police’ [Watch]

first_imgThe last time Radiohead played Outside Lands was the festival’s inaugural year in 2008.The sound gave out twice on that Friday night in August, creating a brief, silent rock show for the small eternity it lingered. But Thom Yorke and the rest of the collective didn’t miss a beat, miming their way through the sonic void.Each audio miscue was promptly corrected, and the dense crowd overflowed with joy watching these titans of experimental alternative create the festival’s foothold in the music scene.Saturday night, in their return to the Lands End main stage at Golden Gate Park, silence fell again, but this time it wasn’t a malfunction.The muted reception from the crowd blanketed the tens of thousands watching into an authentic identity crisis, prompting the question of whether you came for a performance or for an experience.With EDM standout Zedd putting on a sensory-touching performance across the park, it was the perfect example of how much the live music culture has changed over the past eight years.“Burn the Witch” and the ambient ways of “Daydreaming,” the first two tracks on A Moon Shaped Pool, kicked off the set with a sort of anti-opener atmosphere that left the gathered speechless and Yorke skyrocketing to his musical pocket.The set was absolute bliss, with moody staples “Everything in its Right Place,” “Pyramid Song,” “Nude” blended around danceable numbers like “Lotus Flower” and “The Gloaming.”“Weird Fishes” and “Paranoid Android” provided a more palatable contrast, but there was certainly a purpose to the song selection.Radiohead’s music pushes boundaries and can make people feel uncomfortable. You’re unknowingly forced to address your true driving force for seeing live music, and many responded to that by turning around and seeking out the electronic dance party instead.There’s nothing wrong with that. Those that wanted to be there got what they wanted. Music festivals are special because of the collective experience they offer, but with Radiohead, the set was a little more selfish, focused more individual enjoyment.And this is why Outside Lands stands apart from many of its peers. It’s a perfect reminder of our history and future, and unites those two worlds with ease every single year.There was a shared experience at the end, though. Everyone came together and sang the final words of “Karma Police” with a tinge of truth attached, belting out, “For a minute, I lost myself.”What we found, was another masterful show from Radiohead and a special moment for its fans.Watch “Karma Police” below, courtesy of L Yap.You can see the full setlist below.Edit this setlist | More Radiohead setlistslast_img read more

Sheldon Silver Found Guilty in Month-long Corruption Trial

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan), one of the most powerful men in Albany over the last two decades, was found guilty of all seven counts against him at his corruption trial in Manhattan on Monday.Silver, 71, resigned as speaker after surrendering to federal authorities in January but he remained in Albany representing Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Now, under state law, he will also lose his Assembly seat. Silver faces up to 130 years in prison when sentenced.The month-long trial centered around $4 million in illicit profits Silver collected—a sizable income the former speaker failed to report in his annual state disclosure forms. Federal prosecutors said Silver used his powerful position to “secretly direct” a half-million dollars in state funds to a doctor researching mesothelioma. In exchange, the doctor referred asbestos cases to the law firm Weitz & Luxenberg, where Silver worked as a private attorney, prosecutors said.In a separate scheme, Silver, who became speaker in 1994, used his power to convince two real estate developers conducting business with the state to retain a real estate law firm controlled by Silver’s ex-counsel in Albany. State lawmakers are not prohibited from earning outside income but they are required to report such earnings in annual disclosure forms.“Today, Sheldon Silver got justice, and at long last, so did the people of New York,” said Preet Bharara, US Attorney for the Southern District of New York, in a statement.Former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver leaving the federal courthouse in downtown Manhattan after he was found guilty in his corruption trial. (Timothy Bolger/Long Island Press)The case against Silver comes as Bharara is single-handedly trying to weed out corruption in the state’s capital. Silver’s former counterpart, ex-state Sen. Majority Leader Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre), is in the midst of his own corruption trial, which is taking place in the same federal courthouse in downtown Manhattan where Silver was convicted.“Politicians are supposed to be on the people’s payroll, not on secret retainers for wealthy special interests they do favors for,” Bharara said during a news conference on the January day when Silver surrendered to the FBI. “These charges, in our view, go to the very core of what ails Albany: Lack of transparency, lack of accountability and lack of principle joined with an overabundance of greed, cronyism and self-dealing.”Bharara, during the very same press conference, sent a now-infamous warning shot—“stay tuned,” he teased—to other lawmakers potentially scheming the system. Five months later, Skelos and his son Adam were both arrested for allegedly manipulating legislation to pad his son’s pockets. Skelos’ trial resumed Monday following a break for the Thanksgiving holiday.Silver, Skelos, and Gov. Andrew Cuomo were once part of an exclusive group dubbed “the three men in the room,” which maintained a stranglehold on New York State politics. Silver ruled the Democratic-dominated Assembly, while Skelos controlled the state senate, where his party has the edge. Cuomo, a Democrat, split the difference.The arrests of Silver and Skelos sent a shock wave through the system.Most likely, Silver’s conviction will have no bearing on Skelos’ trial, but it does signal a clear victory for Bharara, whom many observers believe staked his reputation on his crusade against Albany’s culture of corruption.Silver told reporters as he left the courthouse that he was “disappointed” in the verdict, which his attorneys are expected to appeal.last_img read more