Teaching about money: Does your state make the grade?

first_imgMost American teens are not learning in high school about the basics of paying bills, building good credit and avoiding debt, even as they’re increasingly relying on student loans to finance their higher education, according to a new financial literacy study.Just five states in the country scored an A on the 2015 National Report Card on State Efforts to Improve Financial Literacy in High Schools, a report produced by the Center for Financial Literacy, at Champlain College in Burlington, Vt. The report measures financial education efforts across the U.S.The five states that got an A are the only ones in the country that require students take a dedicated semester of personal finance courses. Nearly a quarter of the states received a failing grade. Those states have, according to the report, virtually no requirements for teaching financial literacy at the high school level.In lieu of high school classes, teens have to rely on their parents or simply their own research and experience to pick up these lessons — or never get them at all. That lack of sound financial advice is particularly problematic when so many students take on loans to attend college. continue reading » 93SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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