Tag: 爱上海GJ

‘It’s not a political statement’

first_imgU.S. President-elect Joe Biden speaks to reporters about efforts to confront the coronavirus diisease (COVID-19) pandemic after meeting with members of his “Transition COVID-19 Advisory Board” in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., November 9, 2020.- Advertisement – “I want to be very clear: The goal of mask wearing is not to make your life less comfortable, or to take something away from you,” Biden said Monday. “It is to give something back to all of us, a normal life.”Biden also said he will ramp up the availability of rapid diagnostic testing across the country. The Trump administration has substantially increased testing since the beginning of the outbreak, but some public health specialists say the administration should have invested more in testing. Proponents of more widespread testing say that it helps identify infectious people, who can then quarantine and cut off chains of transmission before they balloon into outbreaks.In addition to testing, Biden said he is “building a corps of contact tracers who will track and curb this disease.”Contact tracing is the process whereby trained personnel contact people who have tested positive for the virus and identify others who might have been exposed and infected. It’s long been used to contain infectious diseases like tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases, but it’s never been implemented on the scale demanded by the pandemic.World Health Organization officials have repeatedly called on countries to scale up their contact-tracing infrastructure along with the ability to test broadly for the coronavirus.Infectious disease specialists from Johns Hopkins University and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials proposed a plan in early April to ramp up a national test and trace effort. It would require a workforce of 100,000 people, the proposal said, and cost $3.6 billion. This is breaking news. Check back here for updates. President-elect Joe Biden on Monday urged Americans to wear a mask to help the country bring the coronavirus pandemic under control, to save lives and to enable communities to reopen schools and businesses.“It doesn’t matter who you voted for, where you stood before election day. It doesn’t matter your party or your point of view,” he said. “We can save tens of thousands of lives if everyone would just wear a mask for the next few months.”- Advertisement – Biden’s comments come as the coronavirus is surging across the country. Epidemiologists and medical experts are warning that the worst days of the pandemic are still ahead. The country reported more than 105,900 new cases on Sunday, bringing the seven-day average up over 108,700, an increase of more than 33% compared with a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.“Please, I implore you, wear a mask,” Biden said. “Do it for yourself. Do it for your neighbor. A mask is not a political statement, but it is a good way to start pulling the country together.” Jonathan Ernst | Reuters Biden’s remarks stand in stark contrast to that of President Donald Trump, who resisted wearing a mask in public for months at the start of the pandemic.Top health officials, including Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have said masks are one of the best ways currently available to control the spread of the virus. But the wearing of masks has become a political flashpoint across much of the U.S., with debate raging over local and state mandates to wear a mask in public.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Groups call for pandemic flu vaccine ‘master plan’

first_imgOct 4, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Public health and infectious disease experts today called on the United States to develop a “master plan” for development of pandemic influenza vaccines in order to translate scientific advances more rapidly into improved pandemic preparedness.The recommendation was one of seven pandemic policy suggestions made by the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH), a nonprofit public health advocacy group, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).”The United States must expand and accelerate research efforts and ensure we rapidly translate scientific breakthroughs into real-world practice to prepare for a possible pandemic,” Kathleen Maletic Neuzil, MD, coauthor of the report, said in a news release. She is chair of the IDSA’s Pandemic Influenza Task Force and an associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine.The two organizations also called for streamlining the licensing process for pandemic flu vaccines, developing a nationwide system to track the use and effectiveness of seasonal flu vaccine, and relieving states of cost-sharing for the nation’s stockpile of antiviral drugs, among other measures.The recommendations are part of a 26-page report, “Pandemic Influenza: The State of the Science,” released by the two groups today. The report discusses the threat posed by H5N1 and other avian influenza viruses and outlines the status of efforts to develop vaccines, drugs, and diagnostic techniques for pandemic flu.”An effective US vaccine research and development strategic program must be much larger in scale than current funding permits, in addition to being multinational in scope,” the report states. It describes current vaccine development efforts as a “patchwork” that may not produce rapid progress.The groups called for a “Pandemic Vaccine Research and Development Master Plan to systemize and greatly enhance the current U.S. and international vaccine research and development strategies, bringing together the knowledge of government and private industry scientists.”The master plan should include an inventory of all relevant issues and all activities already under way, the report says. The plan should state which sectors are responsible for completing each activity, list funding needs, and provide benchmarks for measuring progress.The vaccine effort would require a “substantial” increase in funding, the groups say. But in a news teleconference today, TFAH Executive Director Jeffrey Levi declined to name a figure, saying the plan must be developed before its cost can be estimated.”We recognize that Congress over the last year has invested more than $5 billion toward improving pandemic preparedness,” but that is only a starting point for vaccine development and production, Levi said.In response to questions, Levi said he was uncertain if any legislation would be needed to pave the way for the suggested master plan. In working on HIV and AIDS, he said, “Government found a way to convene the academic community and patients and the private sector to talk about issues and share information without violating intellectual property rights.”Levi and Neuzil were asked if they could say which vaccines now in development are most promising. Neuzil responded that it’s difficult to assess the vaccines, because many vaccine trials have been described only in press releases so far, and even scientific journal articles don’t always give full technical data.”From my perspective it’s a bit like comparing apples and oranges, because the data I have on each vaccine are in no way equivalent,” said Neuzil.But what is clear, she said, is that “with H5N1 it’s likely we’ll need more than one dose of vaccine, and we’ll need either a high concentration of antigen or we’ll need an adjuvant” (a general stimulant of immune response).The two groups endorse the US government goal of stockpiling enough doses of antiviral drugs to cover about 25% of the population (81 million treatment courses), but they take issue with the funding mechanism. The federal plan calls for buying 50 million treatment courses, but making the states responsible for buying the other 31 million courses, with a 25% federal subsidy.Levi said the federal government should pay for all 81 million courses. “We need to make sure that every state has the right amount, and not every state is going to be able to afford that,” he said. “We believe this is a federal responsibility, and therefore the federal government should purchase it and stockpile it.”The TFAH-IDSA report also makes the following recommendations:The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention should implement a nationwide, real-time system to track flu vaccine efficacy, distribution and redistribution, uptake, and impact.The United States should boost surveillance for novel flu viruses by expanding working relationships with other countries, especially in Southeast Asia, through the World Health Organization.The nation should embrace policies to increase seasonal flu vaccination in order to reduce the toll of flu and to stabilize vaccine manufacturing capacity. This should include developing “standardized templates for conducting mass vaccinations and countermeasure distribution.”The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should streamline the licensing process for pandemic vaccines, using a different approach than with season flu vaccines.The FDA should adopt criteria for accepting foreign clinical trial data for registering flu vaccines in the United States.An additional recommendation, listed in a news release but not in the full report, is that Congress pass the proposed Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act to improve public health capabilities and support private-sector innovation.The report was written by Levi and Neuzil with Marlene Cimons, an adjunct journalism professor at the University of Maryland’s Philip Merrill College of Journalism.In preparing the report, they drew on interviews with 14 leading experts on flu, pandemics, and infectious disease, including Anthony S. Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. The group also included Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of the CIDRAP Web site.See also:TFAH-IDSA news releasehttp://healthyamericans.org/newsroom/releases/release100406.pdfFull TFAH-IDSA reporthttp://healthyamericans.org/reports/fluscience/FluScience.pdflast_img read more

Derald Gene Ellinghausen

first_imgDerald Gene Ellinghausen, age 76, of Aurora, passed away on Friday, March 24. Born May 19, 1940 in Milan, he was the son of Ervin and Norma Haubrock Ellinghausen.Raised in Manchester, Indiana, Derald was confirmed in the Zion Lutheran Church there. Even though he lived most of his life in Aurora, he always had a special place in his heart for Manchester.Derald graduated from Aurora High School with the Class of 1959 where he played football and basketball. He attended Hanover College where he played football his freshman year then transferred to Indiana University where he was a member of Delta Tau Delta.  He graduated from Indiana University with a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Biology and Physical Education.  Affectionately known as “Big D” and “Mr. E”, Derald taught at North Dearborn High School for one year before teaching at Aurora Public and South Dearborn Schools for 38 years.  He taught a range of subjects including biology, health, science, driver education, and physical education in junior and senior high, and coached football, basketball, golf, and soccer.During his life, Derald was involved in many activities.  He was an active member of the Aurora First Presbyterian Church where he was an Elder and Deacon.  He was a member of Aurora Lions Club for 54 years.  Derald was an IU and Cincinnati Reds sports enthusiast.  Derald enjoyed playing Bridge, traveling, golfing, fishing, watching IU basketball and football games, building swimming pools in the summertime, and the comradery of fellow teachers and former students.  He always enjoyed reconnecting with his college friends and having lunch with his AHS 1959 classmates every Friday.  Derald didn’t know a stranger, as he always enjoyed talking to everyone and telling jokes.  He loved spending time with his family and friends.  Over the years he always enjoyed his pet dogs, especially his recent lap dogs Sophie and Ellie.  He was a wonderful husband, father, grandpa, and friend and will be greatly missed.Survivors include his wife of 52 years, Phee Petscher Ellinghausen who was his high school sweetheart; two daughters:  Amy (Jeff) Goodwin of Solsberry, Indiana, Anne (Tom) Pickett of Heyworth, Illinois; four grandchildren: Matt Goodwin, Katelyn Pickett, Jacob Pickett, and Zachary Pickett; sisters-in-law Jean Petscher and Janis Petscher, brother-in-law Bill (Jennie) Petscher; several nieces, nephews, and cousins; and a host of friends.He was preceded in death by his parents, uncle Walter Haubrock, brother-in-law John Petscher, and several other aunts and uncles.Visitation will be held at the Aurora First Presbyterian Church on Monday, March 27 from 4:00 – 8:00.  In honor of Derald and to celebrate his life, we encourage friends and family to wear red and white for Derald’s love of Aurora High School and Indiana University.Funeral services will be conducted by Reverend Dana Stout at the Aurora First Presbyterian Church, 215 Fourth St., Aurora on Tuesday, March 28 at 11:00am.In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial contributions to the Aurora Emergency Unit, Aurora Fire Department, Aurora Lions Club, Dearborn County Hospice, or Aurora First Presbyterian Church.The family wishes to give special thanks to Dearborn County Hospice, Dr. Steven Langdon, and Dr. Kurt Leuenberger for their care of Derald.If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit:  www.rullmans.comlast_img read more