Tag: 夜上海论坛KJ

Glynn C. Clark

first_imgGlynn C. Clark 88, of Aurora, Indiana, passed away Tuesday, April 10, 2018 in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.He was born March 13, 1930 in Barbourville, KY, son of the late William Clark and Millie Smith Clark.He worked as a Barber for Clarks Barber Shop in Lawrenceburg. He also worked in construction as a member of the Carpenter’s Union in Cincinnati, Ohio.Glynn was a graduate of Napolean High School. He was a member of the First Baptist Church of Aurora. Glynn enjoyed hunting and fishing, especially with his sons; he also enjoyed gardening and he loved a good card game (7-up) and smoking cigars. Glynn always had a smile on his face and he loved people. He loved being with family and friends and he was a very proud grandpa.Glynn served his country as a member of the United States Army during the Korean Conflict. Glynn was a former commander of the Aurora VFW 5312, as well as a former commander of the Aurora American Legion Post 231. He was also a member of the Korean War Veterans Association Chapter 4 and was a valuable member of the KWVA Color Guard for many years. Glynn was also a member of the 40 et 8 Voiture 612 and the southern vice commander for the American Legion representing the 9th District. He was a very patriotic man and was proud of his service to our great nation.Surviving are wife, Carol Clark of Aurora, IN; children, Carolyn (Charles) Crosby of Florence, KY, Gregory (Linda) Clark of Carmel, IN, Linda Clark of Edgewood, KY, Jeffrey (Joyce) Clark of Jacksonville, FL; step children, Tina Waters of Hamilton, OH, David Overbey of Middletown, OH; siblings, Bert (Lorraine) Clark of Burton, MI, Amanda Snider of Granada Hills, CA; grandchildren, Mason & Mia Clark.He was preceded in death by his parents, William and Millie Clark, siblings, Reed Clark, Mayhew Clark, Edmonia Collins, Mae Shierling, and Andrew Clark.Friends will be received Friday, April 13, 2018, 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm at the First Baptist Church of Aurora, 6060 Blair Road, Aurora, Indiana.Services will be held at 5:00 pm with Pastor Bill Secrest officiating. Military services will be conducted by members of local Veterans Service Organizations.Contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association or Honor Flight. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

Holt: Semenya deserves respect, admiration, not skepticism

first_imgUsually when an 18-year-old wins the gold in the 800 meter run at the World Track and Field Championships, she is celebrated. When her mark of 1:55.45 is good for the fifth fastest women’s time in history, she becomes headline material.Caster Semenya is definitely headline material. But not for the right reasons.The South African teen can’t seem to catch a break. Instead of being asked about what it’s like to win gold in a major competition, she’s fielding questions about whether she just might be a he.It’s not just the fact that she already seems to be in position to break world records at age 18. No, it’s at least partly because, well, she looks like a man. In all honesty, she looks like she should be playing point guard for the Madison West boys’ basketball team, not running women’s track. Her facial hair, muscular build and deep voice are all decidedly unfeminine.That’s fine though. We’ve all seen women that at first don’t look especially womanly, and there’s nothing wrong with that — unless you’re one of the athletes that lost to Semenya in the 800 meter final. In that case, you complain and compel the IAAF to conduct a gender verification test on the winner.Aren’t we getting a little bit out of hand now?I’m not saying that I’m 100 percent sure Semenya is a woman. I do not know whether or not she’s been pumped full of enough testosterone to qualify as a male. But until there’s proof otherwise, her accomplishments should be praised. And therein lies the rub: getting that proof.Apparently, determining one’s gender isn’t as simple as having them drop their trousers and having a look-see. There are numerous “intersex” genetic conditions where people develop one way despite their chromosomes indicating something else. It’s all kinds of tricky to get a decisive result, but worst of all, it’s invasive and quite embarrassing. It’s hardly something you’d expect to have to go through after winning a gold medal.But that’s where we are in sports today. Hardly anyone can get away with achieving anything even remotely impressive without being questioned about it. The steroid era of baseball has made everyone at least a little cynical.Remember that season-long home run derby Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa put on in 1998? Everyone was enamored with the chase to break Roger Maris’ record of 61 home runs. In retrospect, it seems kind of silly, now that we know that the race was fueled as much by competitive desire as it was by needles.Fool me once, shame on you.Then we moved on to the BALCO scandal and the names on the Mitchell Report and even more heartbreak. Barry Bonds’ greatest enemy right now might be a potential asterisk and A-Roid found a way to make himself even more unlikable. The term “Manny being Manny” has taken on a new light and if Joe Mauer or Albert Pujols turn out to be juicers, then I might just give up on baseball altogether.Fool me twice, shame on me.It would be one thing if Semenya was accused of being on steroids. The potential effects of anabolic steroid use would account for her distinct “manliness.” As big a problem as steroids are in baseball, they have a more sinister history in track and field. But are we really that jaded now that we bypass steroid accusations altogether and question an athlete’s gender?Certainly steroids would be a more logical conclusion to jump to than gender dishonesty. Plenty of track athletes have been disgraced by their steroid use, including Justin Gatlin and Marion Jones. Semenya’s physique and sudden rise to success would seem to be a classic case of juicing, not a bad sequel to “Juwanna Man.”According to Britain’s Daily Telegraph, sources say Semenya has nearly three times the normal amount of testosterone for a female. Yes that’s fishy, but inconclusive either way. If somehow this battery of tests shows that Semenya is indeed a man, she would be disqualified from competition and stripped of her medals on the basis of her having an unfair biological advantage over her competitors due to her maleness?Guess what? Sports competition is based on unfair biological advantages. That’s why guys like Prince Fielder and Adrian Peterson are pro athletes, while I’m destined to only write about athletes. As fans, we constantly want to see someone faster, stronger and better than the last guy.Unfortunately, we’ve gotten to the point where we don’t want to be tricked into celebrating anything prematurely. The world is determined not to be fooled again. Apparently it’s better to disgrace the athlete now, before they break any records, than to realize we’re just going to be disappointed again.I’m as guilty as anyone of cynicism, but as far as I’m concerned, Semenya won the women’s 800 meters legitimately. I won’t yet stoop to assume the worst right away, but the world seems to be adhering to a quote by our last president: “Fool me — you can’t get fooled again.”Right?Adam Holt is a junior majoring in journalism. Think the scrutiny surrounding Semenya’s victory at the World Track and Field Championships is a legitimate concern? Send your thoughts to aholt@badgerherald.com.last_img read more

Gayle Gordon, 71, Wellington, March 12, 1943 – Dec. 7, 2014

first_imgGayle Gordon, of Wellington, died Sunday, December 07, 2014 at Sumner County Care Center in Wellington at the age of 71.Gayle was born the daughter of Truman and Frances (Baker) Pyles on Friday, March 12, 1943 in Argonia.On November 4, 1960, Gayle and Lloyd C. Lowe were united in marriage and celebrated over 24 years of marriage before his passing in 1985. She was blessed to find love again and on October 24, 1990, she and Henry Gordon were married in Conway Springs. They were married almost 5 years before he passed in 1995. Gayle was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis as a young woman and has lived in a nursing home since 1976. Through her struggles she maintained a unshakeable faith that encouraged her family and those that cared for her.Survivors include her daughter, Wendy Coley (Tim) of Wichita, daughter, Melody Goodman (Kevin) of Wellington, son, Delbert Lowe of Aurora, Colorado, son, Anderson Lowe (Georgene) of Halstead, KS, sister, Colleen Heuback (Jack) of Winfield, sister, Shirley Shinliver (Dennis) of Argonia, brother, Bill Pyles (Christina) of El Dorado, sister, Pat Austin (Jack) of Manhattan, 15 grandchildren, 4 great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.Along with her husbands, she was preceded in death by her parents, 2 infant sisters: Lois and Joyce Pyles and her brother, R.C. Pyles.Memorial Services for Gayle will be held at 11:00 a.m., Saturday, January 10, 2014 in the chapel of Day Funeral Home & Crematory, 1030 Mission Road, Wellington. Chaplain Don Cross will officiate. A private interment will be held at a later date in the Argonia Cemetery, Argonia.A memorial fund has been established in her loving memory to Oaklodges – Wellington (formerly Sumner County Care Center Nursing Home) or Rivercross Hospice.  Contributions may be mailed or left with the funeral home.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.dayfuneralhome.info.Arrangements are by Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.last_img read more