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UWF Basketball Set to Host Holiday Tournaments This Weekend !!

first_imgUWF Basketball Set to Host Holiday Tournaments This Weekend !! Share Dec. 27, 2007PENSACOLA, Fla. – Both the men and women will be hosting holiday basketball tournaments on December 29th and 30th. The Women’s Holiday Classic tournament will involve Henderson State, Arkansas Monticello, West Alabama and West Florida. The Women’s games will be at Noon and 2:00 pm for both Saturday and Sunday, with the Argonauts playing at 2:00 pm each day. The Men’s tournament is the Comfort Inn-Pensacola Beach Hoop Classic, and will involve Fayetteville State, Missouri – St. Louis, Ouachita Baptist, and West Florida. The Men’s games will be at 4:30 and 6:30 pm for both Saturday and Sunday, with the Argonauts tipping off in the 6:30pm game each day.The women’s tournament features a West vs. East Gulf South Conference cross-over. On Saturday, Arkansas Monticello will play West Alabama at Noon, and then West Florida will host Henderson State at 2:00 pm. Arkansas Monticello and Henderson State represent the West Division of the Gulf South Conference, while West Florida and West Alabama represent the East Division. Arkansas Monticello comes into the tournament with a 6-4 record, while West Alabama is currently 3-6. The 2:00 pm game features a 5-4 Henderson State team vs. the 5-6 Argonauts. On Sunday, West Alabama will tip off vs. Henderson State, while the Argos will battle with Arkansas Monticello.The UWF women have lost three consecutive games, and have not played a home game since November 27th, when they defeated Albany State 75-65. The last five games were played on the road, and the Argos won the first two, but then lost to Loyola, St. Leo, and Tampa before the Christmas break. West Florida is led in scoring by freshman Chelsea Patterson at 12.5 points per game. Sophomore Dominique Boykins is averaging 10.2 points per game, and shooting 51% from the field. Senior Tara Russ leads the team in rebounding with 7.4 per contest, while sophomore Point Guard Amy Drake is dishing out 4.2 assists per game. Despite shooting less than 35% in the previous two losses, the Argos are shooting 40% from the field for the season.The West Florida women will take on two teams that rank first and third in the GSC in three-point shooting. Arkansas Monticello makes 10 three pointers per game and connects on 38% of their long range shots, while Henderson State is shooting 36% from three point land. Arkansas Monticello is led by Andrea Dubose at 14.8 points per game, while Kristi Martin is scoring 12.1 points per game. Henderson State is lead by Chanlee Bottoms and Jazmine Ellis, who are both scoring 12.3 points per game.UWF Holiday Classic (Women’s Tournament):Dec 29:Noon: Arkansas Monticello vs. West Alabama2:00pm:WEST FLORIDA vs. Henderson StateDec 30:Noon:Henderson State vs. West Alabama2:00pm:WEST FLORIDA vs. Arkansas Monticello Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

Bench leads Badgers offensively

first_imgGREG DIXON/Herald photoHead coach Lisa Stone and the Wisconsin Badgers have talked the entire season about how important a complete team effort is to their success. In Tuesday’s game against UW-Milwaukee, their mantra proved true as the Badgers’ bench outscored the starters 39-32.Leading the way off the bench was junior forward Mariah Dunham with a team-high 16 points, who also made a crucial 3-pointer with just 1:30 left in regulation to give the Badgers the lead.“Thankfully, we were able to go to our bench,” Stone said. “If you look at the bench scoring we got 39 points off the bench, and that’s pretty special.”Dunham has played well in the Badgers’ past few games as she returns from a back injury that kept her out of the first two games of the season. With the opportunity to watch the team play for two games and now play with her teammates, she sees how important a complete team effort is to the Badgers’ success.“[My] back is actually doing really, really well. It doesn’t bother me at all,” Dunham said. “Emotionally, I’m just really, really proud of the team. I’ve never been on a team that’s focused so much on the team. It doesn’t matter who starts … as long as we got the win.”As the Wisconsin offense stalled in the second half with the pressure defense from UW-Milwaukee, Dunham was able to come in off the bench and make some shots to get the Badgers rolling.“Mariah gave us a lift,” Stone said. “Their zone made us sputter, but I thought Mariah was effective, not only from the three, but also slashing into the middle and getting on the offensive boards for us.”Also making a big impact off the bench for UW was freshman guard Jade Davis. In the midst of a first half scoring drought for Wisconsin, Davis sparked the Badger offense, hitting a pair of 3-pointers and going 2-for-2 from the charity stripe to help the Badgers take a 29-18 lead into halftime.“Jade’s couple of threes in the first half opened it up for us,” Stone said. “We were getting shots off, but they [were] not going in, and Jade knocks down a couple of threes.”Davis finished the game with 10 points on 3-of-6 shooting from the field. She also recorded two rebounds, two assists and two steals in 32 minutes of play off the bench.Panthers steal momentum in second half with defensive changeDespite leading by as many as 16 points with just 11:15 left in the second half, the Wisconsin Badgers just couldn’t seem to put UW-Milwaukee away. The Badgers let the Panthers steal the momentum and send the game to not one, but two overtimes and leaving the Panthers with an opportunity to win the game at the buzzer.The biggest problem for Wisconsin was the defensive change UW-Milwaukee made after the second media timeout of the second half. As the Panthers turned up the pressure on the Badgers, the game’s momentum shifted and the Panthers seized the opportunity.“I felt like we just got Wisconsin off the rhythm that they were in,” UWM head coach Sandy Botham said. “That zone really was effective. Basketball is all about momentum, [and] we were able to get the momentum back on our side.”The Badgers were caught off guard by the defensive change, leading to turnovers and missed shots offensively, which in turn led to Panther scoring opportunities.“I think it was a good move on their part to switch up their defense,” junior guard Rae Lin D’Alie said. “They kind of threw it at us, and I think we just kind of sputtered with it.”Compounding the Badgers’ troubles against the Panthers’ zone and three-quarter court trap was early foul trouble in the second half. Before reaching the second media timeout, Wisconsin had already reached the penalty, giving UW-Milwaukee the opportunity to shoot free throws on every foul the rest of the way.The Panthers made the most of it, shooting 11-for-16 from the line in the second half and overtime.“Our players really fought and put themselves in a position to beat the Badgers on their home court,” Botham said.Despite letting the Panthers take control of the game with pressure defense and strong shooting — UWM shot 54.2 percent from the field in the second half — the Badgers battled back and found a way to deal with the change in defensive pressure.“After a while we found where the open shot was,” D’Alie said. “Most likely, on the two-on-one side, if you could get the ball in the corner you’d have an open jumper. I think, after a while, we found out how to work it.”last_img read more

Syracuse leaving goalkeeper options open

first_imgHarris was pulled in the 71st minute, her first benching at SU. Proulx came on in relief, allowing a goal in a 4-0 loss to the then-winless Crimson. “Lysianne is training really well,” Wheddon said. “I have no problems making a change if we need to.”While Wheddon said Harris had the edge in SU’s goalkeeper competition on Aug. 27, something changed on Sunday. Harris only made one noticeable mistake against NU, a positional error that almost cost the Orange a goal off a corner. Taylor Bennett made the clear to save the scoring opportunity in the 24th minute, and Harris was left unscathed in the first half.Going forward, Wheddon said the goalkeeper is never fully secure. Though she didn’t appear in the team’s first three games and has yet to start, Proulx has thrown her name back into the discussion.“We’re in a luxurious position that if one isn’t getting it done, either one of the two can,” Wheddon said. Comments On Sunday, SU head coach Phil Wheddon made a goalkeeper change at halftime in a scoreless game. Jordan Harris, who has started all five times for the Orange this season, was pulled halfway through SU’s game against Northeastern for sophomore Lysianne Proulx. It was a sudden move: Harris had started for the entirety of this season and was near-perfect against NU, not allowing a goal to eight Wildcat shots. Harris’ replacement, Proulx, only had 105:48 collegiate minutes in goal.It ended up paying off for the Orange. Proulx saved three shots, keeping the game scoreless, and Georgia Allen scored a game-winner in the 83rd minute. The change puts SU in an interesting situation: start the experienced graduate-transfer in Harris or take a chance on Proulx’s potential.“We compete every single day for one spot,” Harris said. “It’s a lot different than everybody else on the field.”Before SU’s summer training camps started, Wheddon assumed Proulx would play in the U20 Women’s World Cup for Canada. SU would go into camp with only one goalkeeper on its roster. Wheddon started to look for a replacement.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHarris had just finished her redshirt junior season with the Razorbacks, where she allowed 0.77 goals per game, posted eight shutouts and started in the NCAA tournament. The season prior, the Orange had lost its starting goalkeeper of four years, Courtney Brosnan, who graduated as SU’s leader in saves. After three years as Arkansas’ leading goalkeeper, Harris made a decision to leave the Razorbacks.“I hadn’t planned it whatsoever,” Harris said. “To put it lightly, it wasn’t a situation I didn’t think I would be put in.”SU was one of Harris’ last offers. She said she wasn’t sure of the move at first, but was won over during her visit to campus a couple of weeks prior to her decision. Harris was impressed by the training regime and the expertise of Wheddon, who has coached goalkeepers such as Hope Solo prior to his reign at SU. Harris liked the challenge of the ACC Coastal Division , a higher level of competition than her opponents at Arkansas, she said, so she chose the Orange in late June.After Harris signed, SU had three goalkeepers on its roster: Harris, Proulx and freshman Ally Wakeman. Wheddon said it was an open competition for the team’s starting spot, as he said the year before.When evaluating the goalies, he avoided using Harris’ experience as a catalyst for the decision because of the style differences between the SEC and the ACC. Proulx was the only keeper with experience in SU’s system, playing 86:18 minutes of relief in her first season.But Wheddon went with Harris in SU’s season-opener against La Salle.“You’re looking for a goalkeeper to have a good day more often than not,” Wheddon said. “And that was the case with Jordan leading up to that first game.”Harris played all 90 minutes in the Orange’s first three games, allowing two goals across the three contests.“It’s hard,” Proulx said. “I try to tell myself there’s time for me to come back. Obviously, you work harder, but at the end of the day I tell myself I’m going to do it because I love it.”On Thursday, SU began to experiment. Harvard and SU were squared at 0-0 in the first half, but the Orange’s backline started to collapse. A 52nd minute penalty kick opened up the scoring for the Crimson. In the 63rd Harris mishit a clearance to make it 2-0 and in the 69th minute Harvard senior Leah Mohammadi knocked in another penalty to increase the lead. Published on September 4, 2018 at 10:57 pm Contact KJ: kjedelma@syr.edu | @KJEdelman Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more