Tag: 上海夜网UA

MLB needs to clean up act

first_imgBack in the summer of 1998, Major League Baseball was caught up in the great homerun chase between Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa. Both players battled back and forth to see who would get to that all-important 62nd home run first. While McGwire ultimately reached 62 before Sosa, fans everywhere — no matter what team they affiliated with — were captivated by the chase. It seemed nothing could go wrong in the game of baseball.Fast-forward just three short years later to 2001. San Francisco Giant slugger Barry Bonds — who was 37 years old that season — surpassed McGwire’s record of 70 home runs in a single season, and eyebrows were raised. How could a record so magical fall again in just three years? It took 37 years for McGwire to break Roger Maris’s record, and now Bonds had broken McGwire’s in just three seasons. Questions of steroids and performance-enhancing drugs began to arise. From that point on, anytime anyone in the game did anything great, thoughts of steroids came up in the back of the fans’ minds.Even when we want to believe a player is clean, evidence or tests prove they have taken some sort of steroid. Case in point: Rafael Palmeiro. During the congressional hearing, under oath, Palmeiro vehemently denied ever taking steroids. Four months later he became only the fourth player in MLB history to have 3,000 hits and 500 home runs. Then just two weeks later, it was revealed that he tested positive for steroids. Even feel-good stories have endings with a sour note. This season, St. Louis pitcher-turned-outfielder Rick Ankiel made his return to the majors with a bang by hitting a home run in his first game as an everyday player. But less than a month after his return, Ankiel is now tied up in a human growth hormone (HGH) scandal.However, it finally appears that MLB — and more specifically the Major League Baseball Players Association — can take a positive step to rid the game of performance-enhancing drugs.According to a report on ESPN.com, a mass-use blood test for HGH will be ready in the coming months. If this report is true, it is time for the union to finally step up and start thinking about the players’ health instead of ways to raise salaries to another ungodly level. They need to approve testing for HGH beginning with the 2008 season for a number of reasons. It took a congressional hearing — where legislators basically had to demand that baseball institute a tougher drug-testing program — for the players union to finally agree to drug testing. Now Donald Fehr and other union execs have a chance to do something that is not only in the best interest of the players, but the best interest of the game. They need to be proactive with this test, instead of waiting until Congress once again forces their hand. Up until now, the reason HGH wasn’t tested was because there was no test for it. Now that one will become available shortly, MLB and its union can further rid the game of performance-enhancing drugs by instituting random HGH tests. And it also appears that MLB has a chance of getting a leg up on the NFL in drug testing by implementing the HGH test as soon as it is available. In the same report on ESPN.com, NFL union head Gene Upshaw said, “There’s no way I’m having my guys punched for a blood test every time they walk into a locker room.”Fehr and the rest of the union need to change their stance and get the HGH test put in place as soon as it becomes available, for the sake of the players and the sake of the game.Greg is a senior majoring in communication arts. He is also the co-design director of The Badger Herald. He can be reached for comments at gschmitz@badgerherald.comlast_img read more

Greg Robinson defends Syracuse career: ‘I think I can, I knew I could’

first_imgFormer Syracuse head coach Greg Robinson spoke to The Daily Orange in an exclusive interview Monday afternoon. He reflected on his Syracuse career and defended his 10-37 head coaching record over the 2005-08 stretch. The five wins from his first two seasons at the helm have been vacated by the NCAA because of violations.“I loved my time at Syracuse. Absolutely loved it. Hated that it had to end the way it did. Wish we had won more. We had great kids. It was a great situation. Great people. I love the town. I go back all the time to see my grandkids.“If you go back and check out the archives of the players that I left in that program. A whole bunch went into pro football that I recruited … I do know this. I left it in very good shape. I’m not going to say it was better than when I came, or whatever, but I’m just going to tell you that I left in very good shape for years to come. And if people really go back and really do their homework, they’d see that. They’d see Justin Pugh, what’s the quarterback’s name on the Giants? I’m redshirting him and Chandler Jones. And Pugh, I’m the one that was recruiting that guy. He ended up being a first round pick. Mike Williams, you still had in the program. And I could keep going. There was a bunch of them. There was a whole bunch of guys. I feel good about what I did there. I needed to win more games.”When asked about his reputation in Syracuse, which has taken a hit publicly since his tenure as the least successful coach in program history, he defended his perception.“I don’t care. My reputation, let me tell you something. To the people that matter to me, I have a great reputation. First of all, I can tell you this. This I do know. I have an outstanding reputation in the city of Syracuse for the kind of person and the kind of family man that I was with my wife and my kids. In that town, I know we’re highly respected, OK? Highly respected.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I have no regrets. I gave everything I had. It’s just, I ran out of time. That’s the bottom line. I ran out of time. I’ve continued to be successful as a coach and I went to Michigan, I went down to Texas again and had success there. I was successful there at San Jose State, and won that bowl game a couple weeks ago. Our defense played outstanding. I’ve got no regrets.“I get it. I understand the business. I’ve been in it a long time. But there was no lack of respect. I believe that. For people that knew, that knew who I was and knew about me, I don’t even blink, because I know how people felt. I think they wish I would have won more. That’s what I think.”Robinson pointed out that things were getting better toward the end of his tenure. Syracuse beat Notre Dame, 24-23, and then Robinson said Syracuse played a “nip and tuck” game with then-No. 16 Cincinnati, a game SU lost 30-10. Both games occurred after Robinson was fired.“There’s always those things. Coulda, woulda shoulda. I’m not into that. It didn’t work. I wasn’t able to get over that hump. I think we were heading there because and look at the last two games I coached. We beat Notre Dame at Notre Dame and then we had (Brian) Kelly and his team at Cincinnati, we had them on the ropes in that game. And we lost one of our linebackers, who got hurt on a play and left the game. We played Cincinnati, and they won the league that year. We had them on the ropes the last game of the season, the end of the fourth quarter, it was nip and tuck. And then we were getting better. I knew we were getting better. If you go look at my quotes from the summer before, I said that we’re not there yet. We’re not there yet. Our secondary is young. It’s going to take a few weeks to get these guys to grow. But it turned out to be a pretty darn good group of guys and it was for the next group coming in, they had a nice group of guys ready to play. That’s really how it is.”Robinson also addressed his final press conference at Syracuse, where he recited Thomas The Tank Engine and said “I think I can.”“I was just saying that I believe. I believe that I was still climbing that mountain. I was still going. We all grew up as kids hearing that story. And I think I can, I knew I could. Like I said, I ran out of time. I’m not ashamed of that. Not at all.”Robinson stepped away from football last month after serving as the defensive coordinator at San Jose State. He said he’s not retired from football, but doesn’t know what direction his career will go in next. Comments Published on January 11, 2016 at 5:24 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Related Stories Greg Robinson coached Syracuse to 10 wins in 4 seasons to complete worst stretch in Orange historycenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more