Tag: 上海夜网RA

Dix Hills Crash Leaves Pedestrian Dead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A pedestrian was fatally struck by a vehicle while crossing a road in Dix Hills early Sunday morning.Suffolk County police said the pedestrian was walking across Deer Park Avenue at the corner of MacNeice Place when he was hit by a southbound Lincoln at 6:20 a.m.The victim was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip, where he was pronounced dead. His identity was not immediately released.The driver, 54-year-old John Capalbo of Dix Hills, was not injured.Second Squad detectives impounded the vehicle, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on this crash to call them at 631-854-8252.last_img read more

US to lift BSE-related ban on Canadian cattle

first_img The USDA rule announced yesterday also sets conditions for the importation of sheep, goats, cervids (deer and elk), and llamas, as well as meat and other products derived from them. The 500-page rule will be published in the Federal Register Jan 4 and will take effect Mar 7, the agency said. Surveillance for BSE at levels that have met or exceeded international guidelines for at least the past 7 years Live Canadian cattle will be allowed into the United States only under restrictions designed to ensure that they are slaughtered by the time they reach 30 months of age, the USDA said. The cattle will have to bear permanent marks indicating their origin and must be transported in sealed containers to a feedlot or to slaughter. Moving cattle to more than one feedlot in the United States will be prohibited. “After conducting an extensive review, we are confident that imports of certain commodities from regions of minimal risk can occur with virtually no risk to human or animal health,” US Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said in a news release. Dec 30, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – US officials announced plans yesterday to end the ban on the importation of live Canadian cattle that was imposed when Canada discovered its first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in May 2003. In considering whether to reopen the borders, the USDA considered the possibility of more cases of BSE in Canada, DeHaven said. “Because of the mitigation measures that Canada has in place, we continue to believe the risk is minimal.” See also: When Canada reported its first BSE case in an Alberta cow in May 2003, the United States immediately banned importation of all cattle, beef, and related products from Canada. In August 2003, the USDA lifted the ban on boneless meat from cattle less than 30 months old as well as a few other products from cattle, sheep, and goats. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) said the borders will be reopened to live cattle less than 30 months of age and certain other products starting Mar 7. BSE, or mad cow disease, has very rarely been found in cattle younger than 30 months. The decision was based on a determination that Canada is a “minimal risk region” for BSE. If BSE were confirmed in the Canadian cow, “It would not alter the implementation of the U.S. rule announced yesterday that recognizes Canada as a Minimal-Risk Region,” Dr. Ron DeHaven, head of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, said in a statement. Ironically, yesterday’s USDA announcement was followed today by a Canadian announcement of a suspected case of BSE in a 10-year-old dairy cow. Results of confirmatory tests on the cow were expected in 3 to 5 days (see link below for separate story). Today USDA officials said they remain confident that Canada’s BSE-prevention program is sound. The USDA cited several Canadian BSE safeguards that helped justify the conclusion that the risk of BSE in Canadian cattle is low: A ban on the use of “specified risk materials” (SRM) in human food. SRM include tissues such as the brain, spinal cord, certain nerve bundles, small intestine, and tonsils, which are likely to carry the BSE agent in an infected animal. (The United States imposed a similar ban on using SRM in human food after its first BSE case was discovered in December 2003.)center_img Import restrictions that minimize exposure to BSE. Since 1990 Canada has banned live ruminants and ruminant products, including rendered protein, from countries that have found BSE in native cattle or are considered to be at significant risk for BSE. Dec 29 USDA announcement CIDRAP News story on the report of a suspected BSE case in Canada “Appropriate epidemiological investigations, risk assessment, and risk mitigation measures imposed as necessary” The USDA first proposed to lift the ban on young Canadian cattle in November 2003. The discovery of the first US case of BSE, in a Canadian-born cow in Washington state in December 2003, prompted the agency to extend the public comment period on that proposal until April of this year. The plan unveiled yesterday appears similar to the proposal presented in November 2003. Even though a renewed flow of Canadian cattle could lower beef prices in the United States, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) welcomed the USDA announcement. NCBA President Jan Lyons said the US beef industry, which lost export markets after the American BSE case was found a year ago, should benefit from the move in the long run. “We expect our trading partners to base their decisions to trade with us on science, and we must do the same,” Lyons stated. “The precedent that has been set by our handling of trade issues with Canada is hurting our government’s ability to fully reopen markets to U.S. beef exports. We must normalize trade with Canada in order for our industry to move forward in the global marketplace, expand our ability to sell U.S. beef to foreign consumers, and put more dollars in the pockets of U.S. producers.” Transcript of Dec 29 USDA news briefing Dec 30 statement by AHIS Administrator Ron DeHaven Before the ban on Canadian cattle, the United States bought about 70% of Canada’s live cattle exports, according to an Associated Press (AP) report today. The New York Times cited a prediction from USDA officials that American feedlots would import 2 million cattle from Canada in 2005, which could lower beef prices for American consumers. A ban on feeding ruminant protein to ruminants since 1997 (the same year the United States imposed a similar ban)last_img read more

Governor Wolf Meets with 4-H Students to Discuss His Commitment to Agriculture

first_img March 09, 2016 Governor Wolf Meets with 4-H Students to Discuss His Commitment to Agriculture Budget News,  Statement Harrisburg, PA – This afternoon, Governor Tom Wolf met with 4-H students to discuss his commitment to agriculture and to the land grant system in Pennsylvania. Governor Wolf’s proposed 2016-17 budget includes a five percent increase, or an additional $2.4 million, for the Agricultural College Land Scrip Fund. This is the largest increase for Penn State’s Ag Sciences and Extension since 2012 when the Republican-controlled legislature cut land scrip funding by 19 percent. With this proposed funding, the governor has offered the resources we need to protect animal agriculture in the commonwealth, which means a safer food supply. The land grant institutions are a commonwealth asset.The Governor’s Office released the following statement:“Governor Wolf supports funding for these important agriculture programs and he is ready to sign the bi-partisan, compromise budget that is balanced, fixes the deficit and makes historic investments in education as well as agriculture programs.“Unfortunately, Republican leaders sent the governor an irresponsible budget that was unbalanced by $500 million, would have grown the already multi-billion dollar deficit and made a $95 million cut to education. The governor used his line-item veto power to ensure the budget was balanced and because Republican leaders did not provide revenue to pay for their budget.“The governor looks forward to working with Republican leaders to pass a real, bi-partisan budget that includes the revenue necessary to fix the deficit, invest in education and fund important areas like agriculture programs.”Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

NSU’s Brister, Sam Houston State’s Miller Grab Weekly Volleyball Honors

first_imgFRISCO, Texas – Northwestern State’s Hannah Brister and Sam Houston State’s Addison Miller are the Southland Volleyball Players of the Week, the league announced Monday.Brister secured her second consecutive Offensive Player of the Week honor and her fifth of the season after pushing the Lady Demons (18-8, 10-2) to a pair of victories over New Orleans and Nicholls last week. The junior outside hitter bagged a .300 hitting percentage for the week with 43 kills, clinching a spot in the 2019 Southland Volleyball Tournament along the way. Northwestern State is back in action Thursday night at Sam Houston State with a 6:30 p.m. CT match on ESPN+.Miller and the Bearkats (13-11, 9-3 SLC) secured a spot in the conference tournament Saturday with a 3-2 win on the road against Abilene Christian. The libero appeared in nine sets and racked up 59 digs for a 6.55 average in their two games on the week. Her defensive presence allowed the Bearkats to hold their opponents to a .154 hitting percentage. This is Miller’s second defensive honor this season.Offensive Player of the Week: Hannah Brister, Northwestern State – Jr. – Outside Hitter – Paincourtville, La.For the second-straight week, Brister averaged better than 20 kills per match and six kills per set. This week she added 43 to her conference-leading total, becoming the seventh player in program history to reach 400 in a season at Northwestern State. She averaged 6.1 kills per set with a .300 hitting percentage. In the win at Nicholls on Saturday, she set a new career best with 27 kills. It was her 11th-straight match reaching double figures and 23rd overall this season. She has had four, 20-kill matches in her last six outings.Honorable Mention: Jodi Edo, Southeastern Louisiana; Corin Evans, Stephen F. Austin; Madison Green, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi.Defensive Player of the Week: Addison Miller, Sam Houston State – Sr. – Libero – Prosper, TexasIt was another big week for the Bearkats’ senior libero as she helped the Kats split a pair of road matches, placing them at 9-3 in conference play, just one game out of second place in the conference standings. Miller averaged 6.55 digs per set on the week and is currently averaging 5.62 digs per set in conference play. She opened the week with an outstanding performance, picking up 40 digs in just four sets on the road against SFA. The total is just the third time in program history that a Bearkat has reached the 40-dig mark in a single match and is the highest of any Southland player this season. Miller is also one of 13 players in the nation this year to reach 40 digs in a single match. She concluded the week at Abilene Christian with 19 more digs in the five-set win over the Wildcats.Honorable Mention: Alyssa Carlin, UIW; Jodi Edo, Southeastern Louisiana; Corin Evans, Stephen F. Austin; Carissa Barnes, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi.Southland weekly award winners are nominated and voted upon by each school’s sports information director. Voting for one’s own athlete is not permitted. To earn honorable mention, a student-athlete must appear on 25 percent of ballots.last_img read more