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University of Vermont Foundation begins operations

first_imgUVM Foundation Board of DirectorsEugene W. Kalkin ’50 (Chair)Bernardsville, NJJohn A. Hilton, Jr. ’68 (Vice Chair)New York, NYRichard Ader ’63New York, NYMax G. Ansbacher ’57New York, NYJohn Bramley (ex officio)Colchester, VTRobert P. Brennan, Jr. ’83Chappaqua, NYRichard Bundy (ex officio)South Burlington, VTDaniel A. Burack ’55Harrison, NYBrooks Buxton ’56Jericho, VTRobert F. Cioffi ’90 (ex officio)New Canaan, CTMichele Resnick Cohen ’72New York, NYSteven Grossman ’61New York, NYZachary Gund ’93Concord, MASteve N. Ifshin ’58New York, NYJames R. Keller ’72Gig Harbor, WATed Madden ’92 (ex officio)Wellesley, MADon McCree ’83Rye, NYPamela Gillman McDermott ’73Hingham, MAKaren Nystrom Meyer ’70Colchester, VTMildred A. Reardon, MD ‘67Williston, VTWilliam F. Ruprecht ’80Greenwich, CTScott S. Segal ’77Charleston, WVWilliam G. Shean ’79Winchester, MAUVM Foundation Leadership CouncilRichard Ader ’63New York, NYMax G. Ansbacher ’57New York, NYJames Betts ‘69, MD’73Alameda, CalilforniaJohn Bramley Colchester, VTRobert P. Brennan, Jr. ’83Chappaqua, New YorkRichard BundySouth Burlington, VTDaniel A. Burack ’55Harrison, NYJ. Brooks Buxton ’56Jericho, VTMichael Carpenter P’09Greenwich, CTRobert F. Cioffi ’90New Canaan, CTMichele Cohen ’72New York, NYJohn Frank ‘79Greenwich, CTSteven Grossman ’61New York, NYGrant Gund ‘91Weston, MAZachary Gund ’93Concord, MAMary Ellen Guzewicz ‘73Westport, CTJohn A. Hilton ’68New York, NYStephen N. Ifshin ’58New York, NYEugene W. Kalkin ’50Bernardsville, NJJoan KalkinBernardsville, NJJames R. Keller ’72Gig Harbor, WADr. Samuel LabowStowe, VTVictor Livingstone ‘87South Hamilton, MATed Madden ’92Wellesley Hills, MADonald H. McCree, III ’83Rye, NYPamela G. McDermott ’73Hingham, MAKaren N. Meyer ’70Colchester, VTWolfgang MiederWilliston, VTJulie Simon Munro ‘86Larkspur, CAJeff Newton ‘79Concord, MAJacqueline Noonan MD’54Lexington, KYMildred A. Reardon MD’67Williston, VTWilliam F. Ruprecht ’80Greenwich, CTScott S. Segal ’77Charleston, WVWilliam G. Shean ’79Winchester, MAJack S. Silver ‘64New York, NYDavid Spector ‘56New York, NYJohn Tampas ‘51, MD ‘54Colchester, VTKenneth Wormser ‘78Demarest, NJCharles Zabriskie ‘53Wellesley Hills, MA University of Vermont,The University of Vermont began a new chapter in its fundraising history January 1, 2012, with the formal start of the University of Vermont and State Agricultural Foundation, Inc.The foundation was incorporated in March 2011 and has since been engaged in organizing its administrative and governance structure. The purpose of the UVM Foundation is to secure and manage private support for UVM. It will devote itself to raising financial support for the academic and related priorities of the university, including gifts that will build a supplemental endowment.”This alliance has broad implications for the financial health of the University, and its impact will be felt throughout the institution,” said UVM Interim President John Bramley. “With the establishment of the University of Vermont Foundation, UVM has signaled its intent to become more engaged in the broader scope of American philanthropy.”As the primary and preferred recipient for charitable gifts that benefit the university, the UVM Foundation is an independent organization governed by its own Board of Directors, , and assisted in its work by a volunteer Foundation Leadership Council comprised of major donors. Foundation responsibilities include identifying and nurturing relationships with potential donors and other friends of UVM; soliciting cash, securities, real and intellectual property and other private resources; and acknowledging and stewarding gifts in accordance with donor intent.”We couldn’t be more pleased with the way the UVM Foundation has come together in the last year,” said UVM Foundation President and CEO Richard Bundy, who came to Vermont from the Iowa State University Foundation. “With an outstanding Board of Directors and Foundation Leadership Council in place, capable and experienced fundraising staff, and a strong and expanding base of engaged donors, we’re eager to take the university to a new level of philanthropic support.”With the official launch, the 75 staff who were formerly members of the university’s Office of Development and Alumni Relations (DAR) became employees of the UVM Foundation, and DAR has been eliminated from the UVM administrative organization. The UVM Alumni Association will continue to operate its various programs and initiatives as an integral part of the overall UVM Foundation.UVM had its fourth consecutive year of growth in private giving in the fiscal year ending June 30, 2010, and set a new record for fundraising receipts with more than $29 million raised in support of UVM people, programs, and facilities.last_img read more

1 training health officials say every business should have

first_imgBefore this law was passed, Alycia McKnight, who once saved someone at work with her own personal kit, hosted a Narcan training with Truth Pharm for her coworkers. Less than a week later, McKnight said one of the kits given out at the training saved someone’s life. Knapp warned the current pandemic may isolate loved ones; she encourages everyone to reach out to loved ones during this time. The drug is more commonly known by its brand name, Narcan. Knapp and others are hoping the law will encourage people to be trained in Narcan and allow them to intervene when needed. She told 12 News she hopes more people realize how serious the opioid problem is in the Southern Tier. Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law a bill that expands Good Samaritan rights to businesses that prevent people from overdosing. Including restaurants, hotels and retail stores, the bill protect businesses if they use Naloxone to save someone’s life. “This is definitely a good thing because the more people that have access to Narcan, the more places that Narcan be used, the more lives ultimately will be saved,” said Marissa Knapp, the opioid overdose prevention coordinator for the Broome County Health Department. For information on how to be trained with Narcan, and how to obtain it locally, click here. “People think that we’re immune to it because we’re such a small community,” said McKnight, who lost her brother to an overdose in 2009. “It’s happening more and more in the rural areas.” (WBNG) — Potentially saving lives just got a lot safer for residents across New York. For local leaders on the front lines of the opioid epidemic, the more people who are equipped to use Narcan, the better.last_img read more

Terrel Hunt looks ahead to spring game, return to action for Syracuse in new offense

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Terrel Hunt hasn’t played in a game since fracturing his fibula in Syracuse’s loss to Louisville on Oct. 3. And though Saturday’s spring game is, as SU head coach Scott Shafer put it, more of a practice, the quarterback is just happy to be playing football in the Carrier Dome in front of fans again. “I just feel more confident in knowing things because I just had a bunch of time to just look at coverages and study coverages and study and see everything,” Hunt, Syracuse’s starting quarterback, said. “I know our defense like the back of my hand.”Hunt said on Tuesday that he had no idea that the spring game would have a practice format with no score being kept until a reporter asked him, but noted he was just ready to just go out and play. He’s also expressed excitement about working with offensive coordinator Tim Lester, who was promoted the game after his injury occurred. Hunt didn’t shy away from saying that it’s beneficial for a quarterback to have a quarterback coach calling the shots.“We’re way further (along) than we were last year,” Hunt said. “And you can ask any player that. Every player knows their job and they do their job right. Last year we had a ton of plays we were trying to run and nobody knew exactly how to run them.”On Saturday, he hopes to make sure he gets the ball out of his hands with good timing. He wants to make sure the energy is up and hopes to stay in the pocket longer. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLester has said he sees Hunt more as pocket passer than the run-centric quarterback he’s been viewed as in the past. “If we have a guy that can run, fantastic,” Lester said. “But he has to drop back, read coverage and make the throw.”He noted that it’s different this year to not work with former offensive coordinator George McDonald, who wasn’t a quarterback coach. He said McDonald couldn’t point out the little things like Hunt’s footwork that Lester sees instinctively. Hunt is using the spring to adapt to a new offense with a new mindset. He’s happy to finally be playing and not on the sideline or in the coaches box helping to call plays. The only thing holding him back is a sore leg. But he knows the only thing that will cure it is time.“It’s been a while,” Hunt said. “I can’t wait to be back.” Comments Published on April 2, 2015 at 11:36 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3last_img read more